Coronavirus trend

This graph shows the trend in daily coronavirus cases confirmed in Warren County from March 18 through June 18.

The number of new coronavirus cases in Warren County has been trending down over the last three weeks, according to data from the Barren River District Health Department.

The decline began the week of May 25, when 83 total new cases were reported and the daily average was 20. Since then, total weekly new cases and their daily averages have remained lower than those reported each week since an initial surge in April.

On Thursday, health department officials confirmed 1,305 total cases in Warren County and 2,005 overall in its eight-county district, including 244 in Butler, 205 in Logan, 77 in Edmonson, 62 in Simpson, 65 in Barren, 39 in Hart and eight in Metcalfe. Of those, 1,368 people have reportedly recovered. The virus-related death toll in the area remains at 51, including 13 in Butler, 11 in Edmonson, 10 in both Warren and Logan, three in Simpson and two in both Barren and Metcalfe.

There are at least 138 total coronavirus cases in Allen County, according to the Allen County Health Department, which is not part of the Barren River district.

The Barren River Area Development District’s COVID-19 Dashboard, which uses state health department data, showed 2,157 total cases, including 1,302 in Warren, 246 in Butler, 201 in Logan, 136 in Allen, 71 in Edmonson, 68 in Barren, 61 in Simpson, 32 in both Monroe and Hart, and eight in Metcalfe.

During Gov. Andy Beshear’s daily briefing Thursday, he reported 13,197 total cases statewide, 351 of which are probable and 235 are newly confirmed.

Two additional virus-related deaths bring the state total to 520. At least 3,506 people have recovered and 400 are currently hospitalized, 68 of which are in intensive care.

At least 329,710 people have been tested statewide, which is about 7.6 percent of the state’s 4.4 million population.

Some daily totals may shift because of data being reported incorrectly. Additionally, numbers often differ between the state and local sources because of different reporting methods.

Meanwhile, Beshear signed a proclamation on Thursday recognizing June 19 as “Juneteenth National Freedom Day.” While the day has already been a state observance since 2005, Beshear said he plans to ask the General Assembly to deem it a state holiday.

On June 19, 1865, the last African American slaves in America were freed by Gen. Gordon Granger. The Emancipation Proclamation signed in 1863 by President Abraham Lincoln only applied to states that seceded from the Union.

Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman also gave an update on the Team Kentucky fund, which provides assistance to Kentuckians affected by the pandemic. She said $350,215 has been distributed to 421 households so far, and there are 398 pending applications.

Beshear also announced that voting rights have been restored for 175,053 nonviolent felons who have completed their sentence. When he took office in December, one of his first orders of business was signing an executive order restoring their voting rights and the right to hold public office.

“This was a priority of ours, it was the right thing to do,” he said. “It was something driven by my faith and belief that people deserve second chances, (and) that redemption is possible.”

He also discussed an incident in Frankfort on Wednesday in which 67 people stood in line for about 10 hours for in-person unemployment insurance help but were turned away. He said the unemployment database had to “automatically shut down” at 7 p.m. in order to send claims to the federal government and to process payments.

But as of Thursday, he said the system will no longer shut down at that time and that those 67 people either had their claims resolved or were in the process of getting them resolved.

On Tuesday, hundreds of people flocked to Frankfort to protest unemployment insurance claims that have not been resolved since March, but they were met with in-person help. Since then, more jobless Kentuckians have made the trip to Frankfort as Beshear vowed to keep the services open through Friday, and said he hopes to expand those services the week of June 29.

“Our goal is ... having people either out in the state (offices), or this group traveling” to different regions, he said.

On Monday, Beshear said a record-breaking 892,000 claims had been filed over the last three months, and more than 50,000 have still not been processed. That same day, State Treasurer Allison Ball said at least 45 percent of the state’s workforce is currently unemployed.

– Follow Multimedia Journalist Emily Zantow on Twitter @EmilyZantowNews or visit bgdailynews.com.

(2) comments

OccupyBowlingGreen

COVID 19 cases are currently down in this tiny area, but spiking for the entire United States. If you put a drop of pee in a glass of water, the pee spreads into the whole glass. The entire US will have to shut down AGAIN, spend another $4 Trillion in stimulus. Millions of Americans will probably die. All because Republicans and Conservatives refused to follow simple rules to protect other Americans. We could have ended the virus spread completely. This 2nd wave is from Memorial day, morons screaming for haircuts. A 3rd wave may be from the Protests, though 99% of them wear masks. Why can't you do something so simple?

Absolutely Positively

Of course. All those responsible rioters and protesters gathering in large numbers and not social distancing have nothing to do with it. It was the people getting haircuts! Liberals are the least self aware people on the planet.

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.