Review: Manly men go on a bloodlust tear in awful 'Nobody'

In this image released by Universal Pictures, Bob Odenkirk appears in a scene from "Nobody." 

“Nobody” is one giant, loud hyper-violent mess – a “John Wick” wannabe that tries to pepper its action with dark humor but fails miserably.

Despite the presence of usually reliable character actor Bob Odenkirk, there is little here beyond a lot of bloodshed. It’s just a mean movie that struggles with the tone throughout.

Odenkirk plays Hutch Mansell, a downtrodden family man who appears to be stuck in the rut of work and home life. Two people break into his house one night, a confrontation that ends with Hutch backing down to prevent possible serious harm to his family.

His decision is frowned upon by his wife (Connie Neilson) and son (Gage Munroe), who can’t understand why he backed down so willingly.

Faced with growing guilt, Hutch sets out to retrieve one of the items believed to have been stolen during the break-in – setting up a series of events that ends with Hutch confronting a group of young men who are harassing a woman on a bus.

It turns out one of these men is related to a ruthless Russian mobster (Aleksey Serebryakov) who targets Hutch and his family in retaliation. What the mobster doesn’t realize is that Hutch has a hidden past of his own – a secret life before he married that makes him more than ready to fight back against the mobster and his crew.

“Nobody” is directed by Ilya Naishuller, who directed “Hardcore Henry” – which basically felt like watching someone play a first-person shooter game.

“Nobody” is just as mean and violent as “Henry,” with Naishuller seemingly obsessed with breaking bones continuously in the most stylistic way possible.

“Nobody” feels at times like a movie that wants to play all of these for laughs, but the violence is so jarring it makes for a totally inconsistent tone.

Odenkirk proves to be a capable action hero, but he really isn’t given much to work with. To his credit, he gets the most out of what he is given, making Hutch slightly relatable but nowhere as interesting as a similar assassin like John Wick.

The one bright spot in this mess is Christopher Lloyd as Hutch’s dad, who provides the one fun moment when he gets involved in the gun play.

It’s great to see Lloyd in a film again and it’s the one creative element in a film that is essentially void of originality. If you are looking for a film with a body count that Jason Vorhees would envy, then “Nobody” is the movie for you. Otherwise, there’s no reason to give this a shot.