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FILE - A doll based on the upcoming Walt Disney Studios film "Mulan" is displayed in the toy section of a Target department store, April 30, 2020, in Glendale, Calif. As supply chain bottlenecks create shortages on many items, some charities are struggling to secure holiday gift wishes from kids in need. They're reporting they can't find enough items in stock, or are facing shipping delays both in receiving and distributing the gifts. The founder of the organization One Simple Wish says many gift requests for gaming consoles and electronic items submitted to the charity have been out of stock. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, file)

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Zenabou Coulibaly Zongo, consultant and founding member of the Council of Burkinabe Women, in her house in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Friday, Oct. 29, 2021. Zongo spends her own money making soap and buying hand sanitizer for mosques, markets and health centers. At the start of the pandemic, Zongo, now 63, was hospitalized with bronchial pneumonia. She paid out of pocket for two weeks' worth of oxygen treatments at a private clinic, where she watched others die from respiratory problems. (AP Photo/Sophie Garcia)

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Women gather to make soap at Zenabou Coulibaly Zongo's house in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2021. Zongo spends her own money making soap and buying hand sanitizer for mosques, markets and health centers. At the start of the pandemic, Zongo, now 63, was hospitalized with bronchial pneumonia. She paid out of pocket for two weeks' worth of oxygen treatments at a private clinic, where she watched others die from respiratory problems. (AP Photo/Sophie Garcia)

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Zenabou Coulibaly Zongo, consultant and founding member of the Council of Burkinabe Women, left, brings soap to a mosque in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2021. Zongo spends her own money making soap and buying hand sanitizer for mosques, markets and health centers. At the start of the pandemic, Zongo, now 63, was hospitalized with bronchial pneumonia. She paid out of pocket for two weeks' worth of oxygen treatments at a private clinic, where she watched others die from respiratory problems. (AP Photo/Sophie Garcia)

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Women join Zenabou Coulibaly Zongo, consultant and founding member of the Council of Burkinabe Women, at the mosque in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Friday, Oct. 29, 2021. Zongo spends her own money making soap and buying hand sanitizer for mosques, markets and health centers. At the start of the pandemic, Zongo, now 63, was hospitalized with bronchial pneumonia. She paid out of pocket for two weeks' worth of oxygen treatments at a private clinic, where she watched others die from respiratory problems. (AP Photo/Sophie Garcia)

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Mariama Sawadogo, 44, arrives at her works as a radio host at Zama Radio, in Kaya, Burkina Faso, Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. Many guests and listeners in Burkina Faso call her "aunty" as she gently guides them to the right answers and awards prizes such as soap and washing buckets. In the West African country of Burkina Faso, many feel the government has let them down during the pandemic. Tests, vaccines and messaging often miss many residents, despite a $200 million budget for virus-response efforts. In a region where women are responsible for family work and community relationships, they’ve stepped up to fill in gaps. (AP Photo/Sophie Garcia)

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Mariama Sawadogo, 44, wears a mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 as she works as a radio host at Zama Radio, in Kaya, Burkina Faso, Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. Many guests and listeners in Burkina Faso call her "aunty" as she gently guides them to the right answers and awards prizes such as soap and washing buckets. In the West African country of Burkina Faso, many feel the government has let them down during the pandemic. Tests, vaccines and messaging often miss many residents, despite a $200 million budget for virus-response efforts. In a region where women are responsible for family work and community relationships, they’ve stepped up to fill in gaps. (AP Photo/Sophie Garcia)

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Mariama Sawadogo, 44, poses outside Zama Radio where she works as a radio host in Kaya, Burkina Faso, Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. Sawadogo's voice has become a familiar sound for nearly a million people in her town of Kaya and beyond. In the West African country of Burkina Faso, many feel the government has let them down during the pandemic. Tests, vaccines and messaging often miss many residents, despite a $200 million budget for virus-response efforts. In a region where women are responsible for family work and community relationships, they’ve stepped up to fill in gaps. (AP Photo/Sophie Garcia)

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Mariama Sawadogo, right, who works as a radio host at Zama Radio in Kaya, Burkina Faso, buys fish, on Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. Many guests and listeners in Burkina Faso call her "aunty" as she gently guides them to the right answers and awards prizes such as soap and washing buckets. In the West African country of Burkina Faso, many feel the government has let them down during the pandemic. Tests, vaccines and messaging often miss many residents, despite a $200 million budget for virus-response efforts. In a region where women are responsible for family work and community relationships, they’ve stepped up to fill in gaps. (AP Photo/Sophie Garcia)