After the Fairness Campaign saw Louisville pass a fairness ordinance in 1999, similar organizations across the state began pressing the issue in their communities. In 2013, the Bowling Green Fairness Coalition lobbied for a local ordinance and was met with substantial resistance as the debate on the need for the legislation continued.

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After three hours of impassioned discussion and comments from 85 speakers, the Bowling Green City Commission voted 3-2 Tuesday night for a sec…

A second and final vote on a measure to provide discrimination protections in the city based on sexual orientation or identity is slated for T…

After two hours of often emotional discussion, Bowling Green remains the largest city in the state without formal housing and employment prote…

As expected, a long-sought Bowling Green fairness ordinance is on the agenda for Tuesday’s city commission meeting.

A long-proposed Bowling Green fairness ordinance is slated to be on the agenda for the Feb. 21 city commission meeting, but whether it will ev…

Candidates for the 20th District seat in the Kentucky House of Representatives agreed Tuesday that the pension system shortfall is the greates…

Bowling Green scored 17 out of 100 points in the Human Rights Campaign’s fourth annual report assessing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transexual …

Bowling Green City Commission on Tuesday heard requests from people seeking a fairness ordinance in the city and approved measures including t…

Bowling Green ranks below all other cities in Kentucky in terms of inclusion of LGBT – lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender – people in muni…

Diane Lewis said living in a city where her son could easily face discrimination without consequences encouraged her to take action.